The Best Art To View In London This Summer 2019

As you probably know by now, the team here at La Collectionneuse loves art. Viewing art opens your mind and feeds your soul , there’s nothing better than spending a couple of hours immersed in paintings and photographs created by someone else’s fascinating mind. So we’ve decided to compile a list of our favourite shows in London this Summer.


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Isaac Julien: Lina Bo Bardi – A Marvellous Entanglement at Victoria Miro

Isaac Julien’s nine-screen installation, premiering at Victoria Miro, traverses a collection of Lina Bo Bardi’s most iconic buildings, offering a meditation on the iconic work and on the legacy of the visionary modernist architect and designer (1914–1992).

‘Linear time is a western invention; time is not linear, it is a marvellous entanglement, where at any moment points can be chosen and solutions invented without beginning or end.’ – Lina Bo Bardi.

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Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition at The Design Museum

The exhibition tells the story of Stanley Kubrick the meticulous genius, exploring his unique command of the creative design process of film making, from storyteller to director to editor.

You'll see step by step how Kubrick created genre-defining worlds for his films and relive iconic scenes from The Shining, Eyes Wide Shut, A Clockwork Orange, Full Metal Jacket, 2001: A Space Odyssey and more. Get an exclusive insight into his mind through over 700 rare objects, films, interviews, letters and photographs. Explore Kubrick’s special relationship with England and particularly London, as his primary film location and source of inspiration.

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Kiss My Genders at Southbank Centre

Kiss My Genders is a group exhibition celebrating more than 30 international artists whose work explores and engages with gender identity. Spanning the past 50 years, the exhibition brings together over 100 artworks by artists from around the world who employ a wide range of approaches to articulate and engage with gender fluidity, as well as with non-binary, trans and intersex identities.

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Lee Krasner: Living Colour at Barbican

This exhibition celebrates the work and life of Lee Krasner (1908–1984), a pioneer of Abstract Expressionism. The first major presentation of her work in Europe for more than 50 years, Lee Krasner: Living Colour tells the story of a formidable artist, whose importance has too often been eclipsed by her marriage to Jackson Pollock.

Discover Krasner’s spirit for invention – from striking early self-portraits to her acclaimed ‘Little Image’ paintings from the 1940s, from collages comprised of torn-up earlier work to a selection of her most impressive large-scale abstract paintings. Explore nearly 100 works, many of which are being presented for the first time in the UK.

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Art Now: France-Lise Mcgurn: Sleepless at Tate Britain

If you’re not heading to Tate only to see the new Van Gogh show and the one by Olafur Eliasson, you will definitely have to stop and look at McGurn’s work. France-Lise McGurn (born 1983) is a Glasgow-based artist who predominantly works with painting to create fluid works that spill from the canvas onto the gallery walls, floors and ceilings.

In her work McGurn draws on a collected archive of found imagery to create figurative installations which express notions of sexuality, ecstasy, loss and consciousness. The new body of work presented in Sleepless explores the experience of living in a city as one that is intimate and inherently sexual. The exhibition title itself evokes key themes in McGurn’s work, including partying, dreams, longing, motherhood and nostalgic popular culture, recalling the 1993 romantic comedy Sleepless in Seattle. Working intuitively rather than through direct appropriation, McGurn uses swift brushstrokes and repeated marks to create loose associations about place and history, inviting viewers to conjure their own narratives.

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Summer Exhibition 2019 at The Royal Academy

Run without interruption since 1769, the Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission art show and brings together art in all mediums – prints and paintings, film, photography, sculpture, architectural works and more – by leading artists, Royal Academicians and household names as well as new and emerging talent.

This year, acclaimed British painter Jock McFadyen RA takes the mantle from Grayson Perry to co-ordinate the 251st Summer Exhibition. Over 1,500 works are on display, most of them for the first time. 

VICTOR EKPUK, THE PHILOSOPHER (2018) Powder coated steel, SHRINE TO WISDOM (2019) Mixed media installation

VICTOR EKPUK, THE PHILOSOPHER (2018) Powder coated steel, SHRINE TO WISDOM (2019) Mixed media installation

GET UP, STAND UP NOW: Generations Of Black Creative Pioneers at Somerset House

Beginning with the radical Black filmmaker Horace Ové and his dynamic circle of Windrush generation creative peers and extending to today’s brilliant young Black talent globally, a group of 110 interdisciplinary artists are showcasing their work together for the first time, exploring Black experience and influence, from the post-war era to the present day.

In this multi-sensory experience, historic works and new commissions sit alongside items from personal archives, much of which has never been seen by the public before, tracing more than half a century of collective history. Curator Zak Ové – whose father Horace was the creator of the first feature film by a Black British director – has invited each artist to exhibit for becoming a true groundbreaker of their generation and their genre.