Cuadra San Cristobal: A Modernist Experiment in Mexico City

 Images via Architravel.com

Images via Architravel.com

Back in February 2018, AD announced that architect Luis Barragán's pink-walled masterwork of Mexican modernism, Cuadra San Cristóbal,  was open to the public—as a gallery space. Plenty Instagram posts and design focused-selfies later, the place has become one of the most photographed architectural location of 2018. So, let's find out a bit of history behind this colorful and experimental piece. 

Cuadra San Cristóbal is part of the Los Cubles project, which also includes the Egerstrom House and the Fountain of Lovers and was developed for Folke Egerstrom family. It is located on the street Manantial East 20, Atizapan, a suburb of the Mexico City.
— www.architravel.com
architravel.com2.jpg
 Images via Architravel.com

Images via Architravel.com

The location has become most visually famous for its particular courtyard, a combination of sweeping geometric volumes in earth tones and pink hues. The structures seem to reveal the tendency of Barragán to create spaces without any particular order, but still full of emotion and poetry.

After studying the work of the Bauhaus Group and Le Corbusier while in Europe, Barragán returned to his home country and opened a practice with a style that would come to define the Mexican modernist movement—a certain rebellion against the idea that modern structures should always be white and outward-looking.
— www.architecturaldigest.com

If you're interested in visiting Casa Barragán, click here.

 Image by Alex Friedman

Image by Alex Friedman